Update on Life Coaching for young people ages 14+

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Update on Life Coaching for young people aged 14+

You might be interested in a recent update to our Life Coaching Page where we’re introduced a new service for parents who have young people aged 14+.

This service offers parents and young people a simple and easy way to get focused on what they want in life and how to get it.

The challenges parents tell us they face with their young people are:

  • The need for more money, financial freedom and to be financial independent
  • Finding a job or career they will be passionate about – but they don’t know what that is
  • Drinking and eating too much and gaining weight which makes you feel awful
  • Difficult relationships that you’d like to see improve or end
  • Wanting to have more self-confidence, improve self-esteem and self-belief and to be passionate about what they do in life in this fast-paced chaotic world where social media has such an impact on these areas.
  • How they could give something back to the local and global community

Find out more by watching our mini webinar which talks about my latest book coming out soon.

In this webinar I explain how my latest book called The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to bring up successful, passionate and self-reliant young adults will change your life and theirs.

Join us on Facebook | Twitter | Web |LinkedIn

Lesley Strachan is a Jack Canfield Certified Trainer in The Success Principles and is based in Hampshire, UK. Lesley is a personal life coach and works in the education and corporate sectors sector using over 30 years of experience to inspire and coach others towards making changes to their lives. She also works in corporate training arena focusing on the development of people to improve organisational efficiency.

Lesley’s latest book is due out soon called “The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to Bring Up Successful, Passionate and Self Reliant Young Adults.” It’s focused on over 30 years of experience working as a life coach with young adults and this book will enable you to help them to discover what they really want to do in life. You can pre-order the book here.

Tip of the day – 5 ingredients

 

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As a Jack Canfield trainer we explore a number of coaching and development areas including Fitness and Health.

So I thought I’d share with you a book I bought recently called “Jamie Oliver – 5 Ingredients”

I was flicking through the book this morning and because we’ll all super busy and stretched for time I found just using 5 ingredients a really easy way to throw a meal together.

I apologise to all serious cooks, I am NO cook – I like quick, easy and healthy meals after a hard day’s work – don’t you?

Whilst it’s cold and dark my next cook-in session will include Comforting Sausage Bake – what will you choose?

If you like this post you can follow us on Facebook or Twitter 

Best Wishes

Lesley

Bio: Lesley Strachan is a Jack Canfield Certified Trainer in The Success Principles and is based in Hampshire, UK. Lesley is a personal life coach and works in the education and corporate sectors sector using over 30 years of experience to inspire and coach others towards making changes to their lives. She also works in corporate training arena focusing on the development of people to improve organisational efficiency. Lesley’s latest book is due out soon called “The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to Bring Up Successful, Passionate and Self Reliant Young Adults.” It’s focused on over 30 years of experience working with young adults and this book will enable you to help them to discover what they really want to do in life. This book can be pre-ordered here or you can watch a mini webinar to find out more before you buy.

 

 

 

 

Why Young Adults Don’t Know What to Do With Their Lives And What Can Be Done About It?

I came across this article recently which I thought you’d be interested in. I agree with Dr Maggie Gilweicz in her article for the Huffpost that students and young adults don’t know what to do with their lives because schools, colleges and universities (with some exceptions) neither encourage them to have this inquiry nor do they provide enough opportunities and/or tools to facilitate it.

At the very best they educate young people for an occupation but they do not educate (prepare) them for life. In other words there is a lack of, what I call, a ‘life education’ in these institutions.

The ‘life education’ I am talking about encourages students to think about what truly matters to them in life, beyond figuring out their occupation/career choices. It prepares them for life where a lack of security and changing circumstances are an actual constant so it teaches them how to navigate, how to adapt and thrive despite of it.

It inspires them to look ‘within’ and help them find their true desires, their passions, their natural skills and talents because this knowledge will serve them as signposts in life and help them determine their life direction.

It teaches them about the importance of mindset and attitude while they try to reach their goals and realise their dreams so they do not end up feeling like helpless victims and instead have a real understanding that they are responsible and capable of creating their reality regardless of various obstacles they might encounter along the way.

It also invites them to question the current definition of success, question the status quo and any norms and expectations ‘imposed’ on them by the society, culture and even parents so that they can define success for themselves and make better choices. It teaches them various ways of dealing with stress and anxiety.

Finally, it gives them tools that can help them figure out what they ultimately want to do in their lives in general and in the foreseeable future so when they graduate they will have at least some, or ideally a clear sense of direction and purpose.

The ‘career’ advice services (again with some exceptions) with their ‘paper and pencils’ tests do not provide such guidance, as Sir Ken Robinson rightly points out: “none of them are likely to tell you that you might be good at playing jazz clarinet.”

Instead, the current scenario is very different from the one described above. Upon graduation many students experience a sense of relief on the one hand, and a sense of dread on the other.

They don’t know what they really want to do, they don’t know where to start and where to look for help to change that. For some the future feels terrifying. The pressure to adhere to the current definition of success (associated mainly with money, fame and status) feels overwhelming. Soon, they either struggle to find a job they really want so they end up getting jobs they don’t enjoy or even hate.

Unable to realise their potential, to realise their dreams they feel stuck in the jobs they didn’t want in the first place, with a degree that now seems to have been a waste of time and, some of them, with a student debt on the top of it all.

These are the future unemployed or the unhappy employees whose lives start at 5 pm on Friday and end at 9 am on Monday. Some turn to drugs and alcohol to numb their feelings of low self – esteem, frustration and fear of the future. Most of them, based on my own research and the literature on the subject, are eager to change their situation but they don’t know how; as the saying goes: “they didn’t teach this in school”. Only it is not just a saying, it is true.

It is a very gloomy picture, I know, but it is real and something must be and can be done about it. This is why it is important to recognise that there are teachers and councillors who do try, to the extent that the system allows, to help students figure out what they want to do in their lives and they should be applauded.

There are some colleges and universities whose deans and/or chancellors recognise the need to introduce ‘life education’ courses and workshops. These are mostly organised on a one of basis with an exception of a few that make them a permanent part of their curricula.

These institutions are the pioneers of positive changes in the education systems who understand that the psychological, social, cultural and economic costs are and will be high if the education that prepares students for life and not just an occupation doesn’t become a permanent part of schools curricula.

I hope that many more will follow because I cannot imagine a better time in a history to make it possible so that young people can have a bright future they want and surely deserve.

Ps. I am extremely passionate about the above subject and I have been researching it for a long time now by using the Internet resources and reading books on the subject. I have also surveyed thousands of parents to help me write my latest book called “The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to bring up successful, passionate and self-reliant young adults”.

So if you’d like to know more about the book and how it will help students find their way in life watch this mini webinar here.

You also have the opportunity today to pre-order my book called “The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to bring up successful, passionate and self-reliant young adults” guides you through easy to do exercises which will enable your young people:

  • To improve their Self-confidence
  • To be happy amongst the chaos in the world
  • To improve low self-esteem and belief in themselves
  • To be more passionate about what they do
  • To be happy, self-reliant, loving, mindful and worldly.
  • To be able to fail and learn from the mistakes made
  • And to stop being fearful and lazy.

I’m also still interested in parents, students and teachers sharing your stories so please email me about (your key struggles, and/or how you overcame them, and what kind of help you could benefit from during your time in education) then please email me at: lesley.strachanct1@gmail.com.

Also, I am looking forward to connect with decision makers in secondary schools/colleges/universities in and around London and Hampshire, if this post has triggered your interest.

So, if you would like to talk about this subject further and might want to consider introducing this kind of education in your institutions email me at: Lesley.strachanct1@gmail.com.

 

With best Wishes

Lesley

 

Lesley Strachan Consulting and Training

“Getting you from where you are to where you want to be”

Award winning Coach| Consultant| Speaker| Trainer| Adviser

Tel: 0044 (0)7739 172447|Email: lesley.strachanct1@gmail.com

Web |​Facebook |Twitter |LinkedIn| YouTube

 

How to improve the mental health of young people

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In this webinar I explain how parents, guardians and teachers can help to improve the mental health of our young people.

Are they surviving or thriving?

My latest book called called “The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to bring up successful, passionate and self-reliant young adults” guides you through easy to do exercises which will enable your people to show:

  • Self-confidence
  • To be happy amongst the chaos in the world
  • To improve low self-esteem and belief in themselves
  • To be more passionate about what they do
  • To be happy, self-reliant, loving, mindful and worldly.
  • To be able to fail and learn from the mistakes made
  • And to  stop being fearful and lazy.

If you’d like to pre-order the book please contact me here:

In the meantime I wish you a peaceful New Year.

With best wishes

Lesley

 

What kind of fresh start do you need?

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Do you feel like you need to make adjustments but you’re not sure where to begin?

Take our test to decide which area to focus on.

Test by Dominique Francois for Psychologies France. Translated by Kerry Whitston

https://www.psychologies.co.uk/test-what-kind-fresh-start-do-you-need-0

Do you your kids to be successful, passionate and self-reliant adults?

 

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I’m writing a book called – The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to bring up successful, passionate and self-reliant young adults based on feedback from over 2,300 parents, guardians and teachers.

The book gives you the most successful self-development techniques I know of, and I’ve combined them with the unique practices I use as a Jack Canfield Certified Trainer in The Success Principles to:

  • Create financial independence and self-reliance
  • Know what job or career path to follow
  • Rediscover more free time
  • Improve your physical and mental health
  • Improve relationships in all aspects of your life
  • Be more self-confident, successful, passionate and fulfilled
  • Take part in the global and local community

Do you have young people aged 14+ or know someone who has? Please feel free to share.

Would you like to pre-reserve a copy of the book? If so, please leave your details here https://lesley-strachan-consulting-training.com/contact/

In the meantime, I wish you a peaceful 2018.

With love and best wishes

Lesley

The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to bring up successful, passionate and self-reliant young adults

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I’m writing a book about How to Help Your Kids Choose a Successful Career and Life. The book is called The Ultimate Guide for Parents: How to bring up successful, passionate and self-reliant young adults.

Why am I doing this?

One of the predominant reasons for writing this book is that throughout my career in education I have noticed that there is a huge gap in the types coaching and mentoring that is available for both adults and young people aged 14+.

In school, we are taught various subjects, given a bit of guidance about what career we should follow and that’s about it. This situation continues to be of concern since the education sector continues to cut budgets and careers services which I’m going to talk about in greater detail later.

What I don’t see, or experience is how schools, colleges and universities or work places tap into the root passions that we are all born with. Imagine if the education system tapped into our core passions and promoted educational subjects around those passions instead of trying to pigeon-hole everyone.

As we get older it doesn’t get much better. How many adults do you know that are stuck in a job they have no passion for? It might even be you! Employers who have training budgets train them in skills and capabilities to do the job. What they don’t do enough of is to align people’s passions, skills and abilities to the organisation’s purpose. Wouldn’t the country be more productive if we all loved our lives and our jobs? Maybe it’s something we should all aspire to?

Do you have young people aged 14+ or know someone who has?

Would you like to pre-reserve a copy of the book? If so, please leave your details here.

In the meantime, I wish you a peaceful 2018.

With best wishes

Lesley

 

How to work with cultural differences to become a trusted leader

Hi,

I’ve recently been hosting workshops with a well known luxury brand recently on “How to work with cultural differences to become a trusted leader”

We looked at some great frameworks for for understanding national culture covering Schein’s three levels, Hofstede’s four dimensions, and Trompenaars’s seven key differences.

Here’s a brief introduction 

By understanding other national cultures’ values, attitudes and behaviours, employees can gain greater insight into how cultural norms manifest in different countries and contexts. Although some methods used to categorise culture have been criticised, they do provide a useful means to understand the likely differences between societies.

This is especially important for employees working on an international basis; understanding the culture of the country they’re based in, and the differences from their own culture, will improve working relationships and business success.

This factsheet looks at why understanding cultural difference matters and outlines various frameworks researchers have suggested for understanding national cultures.

Download the free factsheet here: TTT_International Culture 191217

Enterprise Week at Great Oaks School

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This month I was privileged to be invited to be one of the “Dragons” for The Enterprise Week at Great Oaks School in Southampton where the three of us judged lots of different brilliant ideas that the students would make and sell at the Christmas fayre.

Great Oaks School is a 200 place secondary school for young people with a range of complex learning difficulties including autism and speech and language difficulties. Pupils come from all over Southampton as well as many from Hampshire.

At Great Oaks they follow the full National Curriculum but with a particular emphasis on developing communication, literacy, numeracy and personal and social skills. In addition they have a focus on creativity and the arts which have proved an extremely successful way of engaging  young people and helping to promote their self esteem and self confidence.

As the schools Enterprise Adviser I got involved with the Enterprise Week where all the students had to pitch their ideas for their Christmas products that they were then going to sell at the Christmas Fayre.

The students were truly amazing and some of their product ideas were:

  • Christmas painted pebbles and decorations, candles
  • Table decorations & napkins & cards
  • Decorated lollies
  • Snowmen and wooden owls
  • Xmas gingerbread men and biscuits, marmalade
  • Bird feeders
  • Hand dyed T shorts and socks

They had made the products themselves and were looking for funding to make batches to sell at the Christmas Fayre. SO far they’ve made over £2.000.00 so a huge well done and congratulations to all the teams for their hard work. I love you all.